Books I’ve Read in June (Or didn’t actually)

Okay you guys don’t be mad at me! I needed a break! From writing and reading but i’m back!

Needless to say JUNE SUCKED!!

I only read two books and they both sucked!! Which is probably why I decided to take a break in the first place….

Here goes…

2. Abandon by Blake Crouch

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On Christmas Day in 1893, every man, woman and child in a remote gold mining town disappeared, belongings forsaken, meals left to freeze in vacant cabins; and not a single bone was ever found. One hundred thirteen years later, two backcountry guides are hired by a history professor and his journalist daughter to lead them into the abandoned mining town so that they can learn what happened. With them is a psychic, and a paranormal photographer—as the town is rumored to be haunted. A party that tried to explore the town years ago was never heard from again. What this crew is about to discover is that twenty miles from civilization, with a blizzard bearing down, they are not alone, and the past is very much alive.

I Thought…

HORRIBLE!!! ugh I’m getting mad just thinking about the time I wasted on this damn book. I really enjoyed the Wayward Pines series by Blake Crouch so I figured I’d give this book a shot. Thank God that is over!!!!! omg!! It took me forever to finish that book! so many unneccesary details and fluff. By the end I was just skimming the pages thinking “ok ok get on with it already” sheesh! I rated it one star on my goodreads page.

 

1. Bread or Death: Memories of My Childhood During and After the Holocaust by Milton Mendel Kleinberg

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The war brought about scarcities of just about everything…except misery.
“Alle raise,” (everybody out), the German soldiers screamed as they pounded on our door with the butts of their rifles. And thus began a 4,500-mile journey from Poland through Russia and Siberia and eventually to Uzbekistan in Central Asia, as the author’s family used bribery and darkness of night to flee as the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939.

Young Mendel, from age four to fourteen, tells in vivid detail the wretched journey in cramped cattle cars through frigid Russia, the indignities of being forced labor, the shame of begging for bread just to survive, and death of those closest to him. The family s plight includes abandonment, hunger, and separation (and later remarkable twists of fate and reunion) quite unlike other Holocaust stories.

This coming-of-age, Holocaust memoir is the author’s personal account of how through great sacrifices by his mother he managed to survive the worst atrocities in human history and his uncertain days in a Polish Children’s Home, scrabbling for fallen fruit, and surviving kidnapping and murder on the Black Road, and return to German Displaced Persons camps at war’s end. But to what fate?

Originally written as a memoir just for his grandchildren, Milton Kleinberg gives a moving account of his family s hardships and eventual immigration with a lump-in-the-throat passage to America past the Statue of Liberty and into a land of opportunity tinged with bigotry yet with a promise to future generations.”

I Thought…

This was an average read. I was trying to step outside the box and read something a little different. I didn’t hate it, but I didn’t love it. And despite what I originally thought, this book didn’t provoke a lot of emotion from me. It is a great historical piece. I rated it 3 stars on Goodreads.

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